Slave Cemetery Dating Back to 1898 Discovered

Officials have been working for months to develop the Berry Hill Mega Park in Pittsylvania County. but now, it looks as though they'll have an extra project to work on. A resident has discovered a large slave cemetary on the property. They believe there are thousands of graves there, some dating back to 1898. Read More … [Read more...]

Save Black History from Developers

This is a national appeal for your help in the effort to save one of this country's most important Black History sites -- an effort that has now reached a critical stage. Richmond's Shockoe Bottom was once the site of the second largest slave market in the United States. In the three decades before the Civil War, most of the 300,000 and 350,000 Black people sold from Virginia passed through its auction houses. By 1860, there were 4.5 million people of African descent in the U.S., so just do the math: today, the majority of Black people in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico can probably trace … [Read more...]

Early African American and Anti-Slavery Newspapers: Sources for African American Genealogy Research

Genealogists are very familiar with the importance of newspapers in their search of family history. They have often been described as the "diaries" of a community, providing notices of deaths, births and marriages; murders and crime; political news, local events, etc. In general newspapers usually serve a geographical community, but also can target a group with a specific ethnic, social or political interest. Early African American and Anti-Slavery newspapers are examples of the latter type of publication and both are valuable resources for African American genealogy research, providing both … [Read more...]

Atlanta lawsuit spotlights obscure black community

Ed Daugherty remembers passing the graveled streets, modest homes and painted white church in Macedonia Park as a teenager on his way to school. Now 82, Daugherty is among the dwindling number of Atlantans who still remember the black enclave once nestled in the city's affluent Buckhead neighborhood. The community embodied a bygone but common custom here, typical of many clusters of convenience in the South where black workers lived close to the white families for whom they worked. Read more: Miami Herald … [Read more...]

Hampton is birthplace of black America, history enthusiast says

When you can reach as far back into the past as the city of Hampton, chances are that at least some people will sit up and take notice. But even in this old seaport town, not enough people are paying attention to the unsurpassed collection of nationally prominent African-American milestones that have taken place here over the past 400 years, says Hampton resident Calvin Pearson. Read more: Daily Press … [Read more...]

Why retracing our African roots is so difficult

Many African Americans have longed to know their African roots, especially because our language and heritage have been destroyed by colonizers. Historians have long documented that large numbers of Blacks were brought from different areas in Africa to what is now the United States. But in genealogy research, researchers have to prove the identity of specific individuals, and then document and prove relationships of them to their ancestors. Read more: CNN Blogs … [Read more...]

Genealogy Talk Show Targets Mixed Raced Genealogy Researchers

Tune in to Anita Talks Genealogy Friday nights for topics on Genealogy. Host Anita Wills, gives Tips on Documenting and Researching for those new to Genealogy. The show covers topics of interest to those who are of Mixed Raced Ancestry. Join Anita beginning September 18, 2009, from 8:00-8:45 pm, (pst). Author Anita Wills, has written two Family History Books, Pieces of the Quilt: The Mosaic of An African American Family, and Notes And Documents of Free Persons of Color, a Speaker on topics relating to Genealogy and writing Family History Books. Listeners can call in with questions, to (347) … [Read more...]

Paying tribute to a Masonic icon

The Prince Hall Memorial will not bear its namesake’s image when it is erected on Cambridge Common this November. No pictures of the indentured servant-turned-abolitionist can be found, nor much description on which to base an artist’s depiction. And while Prince Hall’s contributions to American history and the antislavery movement are familiar to historians and members of the Masonic lodge he created, he is not a well-known figure. Read more: The Boston Globe … [Read more...]

Granddaughter seeks to save old Ga. black cemetery

A historic cemetery that is the last trace of an African-American community founded by former slaves is at the center of a legal battle between a developer and a woman whose grandparents and uncle are buried there. A lawsuit has been filed in Fulton County Superior Court on behalf of Elon Butts Osby seeking to stop Brandon Marshall from removing Mt. Olive Cemetery, which was once part of Macedonia Park. The area was a black community first settled by former slaves before becoming a formal subdivision in the 1920s. Read more: South Florida Times … [Read more...]

Mystery Florida Graveyard May Be Historical Bahamian Cemetery

An unmarked cemetery found in South Florida is believed to be the burial site of over 500 Bahamians, Florida officials say. Florida historian, Larry Wiggins, says he believes the site is of the Lemon City Cemetery, a cemetery for settlers from the Bahamas who went to South Florida in the early 1900s to tend to wealthy whites, and to help build Florida’s most cosmopolitan city. Teresita DeVeaux, a 100-year-old woman who was born in the Bahamas and moved to Miami as a child during the early 1900s, told international media that she remembered that a young man named Theophilus Clark was … [Read more...]