South Louisiana researcher seeks to preserve records of the slavery era

It is impossible for descendants of African-American slaves to research their family history without encountering the harsh reality their ancestors experienced, a local researcher said.

For instance, looking through the kinds of records others might consult when doing genealogy work — such as birth and death certificates, newspaper obituaries and the like — may offer little help.

That's because during the time the institution was in place, slaves were considered property under the law, said Patricia Whitney, executive director of the Bayou History Center.

"Look at property records, not people records," she said.

Read More: South Louisiana researcher seeks to preserve records of the slavery era

Comments

  1. Dear Researcher,

    What kind of work are you doing? Could you let me know I may have some information for you that may help.

    Thanks

  2. I’M HAVING A VERY HARD TIME FINDING ANCESTORS CONNECTION IN LOUISIANA, LIKE FOR INSTANCE WHO IS SARAH BERNARDS PARENTS OR PARENT?WE KNOW THAT SHE WAS BORN IN ASSUMPTION PARISH LOUISIANA IN 1864, WE COME TOO A BRICK WALL HERE, WHAT KIND OF WORK I’M DOING ? RESEARCHING THE SURNAMES OF MY ANCESTORS I BELIEVE ALL BORN IN LOUISIANA, EXCEPT THE BARNES SURNAME THAT WOULD BE VIRGINIA, CAN YOU HELP?

  3. I am researching the family history of Elizabeth Ross (Bradford) from St. James Parish, LA (Black Female)

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