Save Black History from Developers

This is a national appeal for your help in the effort to save one of this country's most important Black History sites -- an effort that has now reached a critical stage. Richmond's Shockoe Bottom was once the site of the second largest slave market in the United States. In the three decades before the Civil War, most of the 300,000 and 350,000 Black people sold from Virginia passed through its auction houses. By 1860, there were 4.5 million people of African descent in the U.S., so just do the math: today, the majority of Black people in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico can probably trace … [Read more...]

With unearthing of infamous jail, Richmond confronts its slave past

The place called Lumpkin's Slave Jail was indeed a jail, but it was much more than that. It was a holding pen for human chattel. In Richmond's Shockoe Bottom river district, the notorious slave trader Robert Lumpkin ran the city's largest slave-holding facility in the 1840s and 1850s. Tens of thousands of blacks were held in the cramped brick building while they waited to be sold. Read More … [Read more...]

Richmond slave jail’s foundation found

With young black men used as bait, dogs were trained to track and pursue runaway slaves in the cobblestone courtyard of a Richmond slave jail. Hidden for more than a century, the courtyard of round, gray stones and other remnants of Lumpkin's Slave Jail lay exposed yesterday in the corner of a Shockoe Bottom parking lot. Read More … [Read more...]