Canady family traces history to slavery

In 1929, Little Jim Canady's family could not afford the luxury of a conventional grave marker, but his son, Ira Canady Sr., took measures to ensure this burial site would never be lost. Though many impoverished survivors traditionally employed large rocks to designate a burial site, Ira Canady Sr. at age 29, manifested his family's ingenious and pragmatic traits by choosing a long iron pole topped with a ring that he salvaged from an old farm implement to identify the grave in rural Little Rocky Cemetery, northeast of Cameron off FM 2095. Read More … [Read more...]

In First Lady’s Roots, a Complex Path From Slavery

In 1850, the elderly master of a South Carolina estate took pen in hand and painstakingly divided up his possessions. Among the spinning wheels, scythes, tablecloths and cattle that he bequeathed to his far-flung heirs was a 6-year-old slave girl valued soon afterward at $475. In his will, she is described simply as the “negro girl Melvinia.” After his death, she was torn away from the people and places she knew and shipped to Georgia. While she was still a teenager, a white man would father her first-born son under circumstances lost in the passage of time. Read More … [Read more...]

Genealogy gathering; 420 expected for conference, library’s largest yet

Genealogy and historical research buffs, from the local to the international level, will descend on the Allen County Public Library later this month for “Reconnecting Lost Links,” the International Black Genealogy Summit. The conference, Oct. 29-31, will feature speakers and workshops for the novice genealogist to the seasoned researcher at the library, which is the second-largest genealogy research center in North America. The first day is free, and the final two days cost $100 for both or $75 for one. Read More … [Read more...]

Save Black History from Developers

This is a national appeal for your help in the effort to save one of this country's most important Black History sites -- an effort that has now reached a critical stage. Richmond's Shockoe Bottom was once the site of the second largest slave market in the United States. In the three decades before the Civil War, most of the 300,000 and 350,000 Black people sold from Virginia passed through its auction houses. By 1860, there were 4.5 million people of African descent in the U.S., so just do the math: today, the majority of Black people in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico can probably trace … [Read more...]

Early African American and Anti-Slavery Newspapers: Sources for African American Genealogy Research

Genealogists are very familiar with the importance of newspapers in their search of family history. They have often been described as the "diaries" of a community, providing notices of deaths, births and marriages; murders and crime; political news, local events, etc. In general newspapers usually serve a geographical community, but also can target a group with a specific ethnic, social or political interest. Early African American and Anti-Slavery newspapers are examples of the latter type of publication and both are valuable resources for African American genealogy research, providing both … [Read more...]

Why retracing our African roots is so difficult

Many African Americans have longed to know their African roots, especially because our language and heritage have been destroyed by colonizers. Historians have long documented that large numbers of Blacks were brought from different areas in Africa to what is now the United States. But in genealogy research, researchers have to prove the identity of specific individuals, and then document and prove relationships of them to their ancestors. Read more: CNN Blogs … [Read more...]

Genealogy Talk Show Targets Mixed Raced Genealogy Researchers

Tune in to Anita Talks Genealogy Friday nights for topics on Genealogy. Host Anita Wills, gives Tips on Documenting and Researching for those new to Genealogy. The show covers topics of interest to those who are of Mixed Raced Ancestry. Join Anita beginning September 18, 2009, from 8:00-8:45 pm, (pst). Author Anita Wills, has written two Family History Books, Pieces of the Quilt: The Mosaic of An African American Family, and Notes And Documents of Free Persons of Color, a Speaker on topics relating to Genealogy and writing Family History Books. Listeners can call in with questions, to (347) … [Read more...]